Tag: bookworm

Book Review: The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo

Hilarious. Sometimes serious, but a good mix the with funny moments. Some chapters must have been hard for Schumer to write, sharing very personal life moments. But the overall book is heartfelt with great humour running through it. There was the odd bit that I felt were overdone – but for the book as a whole – I’d recommend it for a summer read, if you’re looking for something light and easy to read.

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Book Review: Where’d You Go, Bernadette

This was hands down a five star book for me. The whole thing intrigued me – how it was written, the fantastically quirky, reclusive character of Bernadette, the gnats, the simple one-liners that made me smile and the whole plan of a trip to Antarctica.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette is like no other book I have ever read. I flew through it and couldn’t put it down.

A must read if you are looking for something fresh and funny.

Now I must go through the rest of Maria Semple’s novels!

Book Review: Sweetbitter

I was drawn in by cover-lust. But that’s where the lust ends.

Sweetbitter follows a bunch of misfits getting high, getting drunk, quoting literature, working in a high end restaurant and messing with each other’s lives. You can’t fall in love with any of the characters, nor feel any empathy for them. This book was not intriguing nor well written.

One star.

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Four books I can’t wait to sink my teeth into

Since I bought my first Kindle back in 2011 I have been an avid reader. I have always loved books, but with university and being in my early 20s I never made the time to read or get properly sucked into books. But I found adding the Kindle to my daily life made me read more frequently and therefore get through books much quicker. The addiction of buying books straight from Amazon and knowing they will be present on your Kindle within minutes also made it easier.

blackrabbithallBlack Rabbit Hall by Eve Chase; Amber and Toby and Barney and Kitty.

The four Alton children spend every day of the hot Cornish summer playing games on sun-baked lawns or building dens in the dark woods. Endless days of laughter and fun, without an adult in sight.

But no one can foresee the storm that will bring it all to a tragic end.

Afterwards, Black Rabbit Hall, their home, with its endless corridors and ancient creaking clocks, is a twisted and changed place, set to steal the last vestiges of their childhood and innocence. A home that not all of the Altons will be strong enough to survive.

Now, thirty years later, a message from one of the Alton children is discovered carved into an old oak tree. Could the tangled truth of that terrible summer finally creep into the light? Or should some secrets be left in the past for good?

aboutgraceAbout Grace by Anthony Doerr; David Winkler begins life in Anchorage, Alaska, a quiet boy drawn to the volatility of weather and obsessed with snow. Sometimes he sees things before they happen; a man carrying a hatbox will be hit by a bus; Winkler will fall in love with a woman in a supermarket. When David dreams that his infant daughter will drown in a flood as he tries to save her, he comes undone. He travels thousands of miles, fleeing family, home, and the future itself, to deny the dream.

On a Caribbean island, destitute, alone, and unsure if his child has survived or his wife can forgive him, David is sheltered by a couple with a daughter of their own. Ultimately it is she who will pull him back into the world, to search for the people he left behind.

love-ninaLove, Nina by Nina Stibbe: In the 1980s Nina Stibbe wrote letters home to her sister in Leicester describing her trials and triumphs as a nanny to a London family. Nina Stibbe’s Love, Nina: Despatches from Family Life is the laugh-out-loud story of the trials and tribulations of a very particular family.

This was later made into a TV series too! But of course, best to always read the book first.

 

 

 

how-i-lost-youHow I Lost You by Jenny Blackhurst: They told her she killed her son. She served her time. But what if they lied? I have no memory of what happened but I was told I killed my son. And you believe what your loved ones, your doctor and the police tell you, don’t you? My name is Emma Cartwright. Three years ago I was Susan Webster, and I murdered my twelve-week-old son Dylan. I was sent to Oakdale Psychiatric Institute for my crime, and four weeks ago I was released early on parole with a new identity, address and a chance to rebuild my tattered life. This morning, I received an envelope addressed to Susan Webster. Inside it was a photograph of a toddler called Dylan. Now I am questioning everything I believe because if I have no memory of the event, how can I truly believe he’s dead? If there was the smallest chance your son was alive, what would you do to get him back?

I set myself the challenge of reading 30 books in 2016. Unfortunately I’m only on book number 21 so I need to up my speed to just shy of a book per week. Eek! My books to date:

2016-books

I’m always keen for new book titles to add to my ever-growing list. So what’s next on yours?

 

Book Review: Circling the Sun

I loved the idea of this book. It’s romantic but in a strong heroin ideal. The story follow Beryl, a young, strong minded girl (grown to woman) from England and moved to Kenya at a young age. It tells you of the struggle of young women in the 1920s and how little their options were, but how if you are determined you can push ahead not matter your gender. Set mostly in Kenya, Beryl spends time with well to do expat Aristocrats, and local Kenyans.

The book is about aviation coming about, but ultimately is about Beryl’s journey to find her passion in life. She ends up with all the wrong men and can not be tamed.

The only thing I disliked about the book was how much was focussed on horses – it does show you the insight to horse training and I guess you could say the strong willed horses she trains a metaphors for her own personality – but at times I felt there was too much.

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Book Review: A Man Called Ove

This is a five star book for me. I had no expectation going into, it having never read any of Backman’s books. Set in Sweden with a backdrop of a calm suburban street, it’s both comical and heartwarming.

Ove is cranky, he reminds me of Mr Fredricksen in the film Up, they both have the same short temper towards change, other people interfering and have lost their wives, their kindred spirits.

“Ove had never been asked how he lived before he met her. But if anyone had asked him, he would have answered that he didn’t.”

The book is also full of humour, from a grumpy old man’s point of view. Backman’s way with words and clear descriptions of characters and situations had me in giggles on the bus and on the tube on the way to work.

“Ove glares out of the window. The poser is jogging. Not that Ove is provoked by jogging. Not at all. Ove couldn’t give a damn about people jogging. What he can’t understand is why they have to make such a big thing of it. With those smug smiles on their faces, as if they were out there curing pulmonary emphysema.”

It’s a book I know I will go back to and an author I will research more on. I have read another of Backman’s books, Britt-Marie was Here, I did enjoy it but the character of Ove is what made me fall in love with his first novel. The book has also been made into a film, which I’ve not seen, but as always I would say read the book first!

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Book Review: Shtum

I was blown away by this book. We’ve all heard of autism and think we know the general jist. But reading this book really opened my eyes to the everyday challenges people with autism and their loved ones must manage through.

Parts of this book made me laugh out loud, Lester’s descriptions of shit smeared walls and the complete frustrations you feel for Jonah’s parents make this book heartfelt and endearing. Points in this book are hard to read, the sacrifice and struggle, and a bout of alcoholism doesn’t make a story of plain-sailing, however it does capture your interest and you won’t be able to put it down.

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